support for non monosexuals

mxtori:

Casual reminder that your white cis-gay ass wouldn’t have a “gay movement” had it not been for trans women of color. 

glitterlion:

Laverne Cox"Ain’t I A Woman? My Journey to Womanhood"Wednesday, February 26, 2004University of Georgia, Tate Theater @ 7:00PM
Laverne Cox explores how the intersections of race, class, and gender uniquely affect the lives of trans women of color. Laverne draws from her own personal story and how issues of race, class, and gender affect how she has been able to navigate the world. From growing up in Mobile, Alabama, raised by a single mother in a Christian family, to attending college in New York City to pursue a career as an actress, to finally finding the courage to step into the womanhood she always knew at heart was her destiny, Cox tells the story of the unique challenges along her journey to womanhood, professional achievement, self-acceptance, and love.
TicketsFree for Students, $5 public,Available at the Tate Cashier WindowSeating is limited - tickets required for entry

glitterlion:

Laverne Cox
"Ain’t I A Woman? My Journey to Womanhood"
Wednesday, February 26, 2004
University of Georgia, Tate Theater @ 7:00PM

Laverne Cox explores how the intersections of race, class, and gender uniquely affect the lives of trans women of color. Laverne draws from her own personal story and how issues of race, class, and gender affect how she has been able to navigate the world. From growing up in Mobile, Alabama, raised by a single mother in a Christian family, to attending college in New York City to pursue a career as an actress, to finally finding the courage to step into the womanhood she always knew at heart was her destiny, Cox tells the story of the unique challenges along her journey to womanhood, professional achievement, self-acceptance, and love.

Tickets
Free for Students, $5 public,Available at the Tate Cashier Window
Seating is limited - tickets required for entry

gay-men:

Illustrators Back Gay Rights in Russia - Julia Bereciartu

gay-men:

Illustrators Back Gay Rights in Russia - Julia Bereciartu

bisexual-community:

femmedetectives:

Openly lesbian and bisexual athletes at the Sochi Winter Olympics

Anastasia Bucsis (Canada) - long track speed skating
Barbara Jezeršek (Slovenia) - cross country skiing
Belle Brockhoff (Australia) - snowboarding
Cheryl Maas (Netherlands) - snowboarding
Daniela Iraschko-Stolz (Austria) - ski jumping
Ireen Wüst (Netherlands) - long track speed skating
Sanne van Kerkhof (Netherlands) - short track speed skating

Let’s all follow and cheer for our brave athletes! We’ll try to keep track and keep you all updated, ok?

Spot fucking on

Spot fucking on

(Source: gaymish)

angrybisexual:

teacupnosaucer:

transcendboundaries:

land-sailor:

inextinguishabledesires:

House got a lot of things wrong but sometimes it got things very very right.

ALTHOUGH YOU CAN IF YOU’RE INTO THAT KINDA THING :wiggles eyebrows:

"do you understand what bisexual means?" is a pretty nice comeback.

active-rva:

Today is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. 
Due to factors like the immense disparity in healthcare access between black Americans and other groups, the rate of HIV infection for African Americans is approximately eight times higher than for white Americans. 
This disparity was present even at the very beginning of the AIDS pandemic, and is very likely part of the reason why the US government’s response to the burgeoning public health crisis was so slow- Ronald Reagan’s administration perceived AIDS as killing primarily three groups: black Haitian immigrants, gay men, and drug users. The racism and homophobia of those involved in delaying official acknowledgement of HIV/AIDS is, in large part, why the disease grew into a global scourge. 
It is important to know your status, and everyone should get tested at least once, even if you do not believe that you are in a high-risk category. You can obtain free, fast, oral testing in almost every city; see this link for a means to search for a clinic near you. 

active-rva:

Today is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. 

Due to factors like the immense disparity in healthcare access between black Americans and other groups, the rate of HIV infection for African Americans is approximately eight times higher than for white Americans. 

This disparity was present even at the very beginning of the AIDS pandemic, and is very likely part of the reason why the US government’s response to the burgeoning public health crisis was so slow- Ronald Reagan’s administration perceived AIDS as killing primarily three groups: black Haitian immigrants, gay men, and drug users. The racism and homophobia of those involved in delaying official acknowledgement of HIV/AIDS is, in large part, why the disease grew into a global scourge. 

It is important to know your status, and everyone should get tested at least once, even if you do not believe that you are in a high-risk category. You can obtain free, fast, oral testing in almost every city; see this link for a means to search for a clinic near you

glaad:

During the Olympics, and long after they’re done, we stand with LGBT Russians http://glaad.org/russia 

glaad:

During the Olympics, and long after they’re done, we stand with LGBT Russians http://glaad.org/russia 

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: the cover of Struggling Alone: The Lived Realities of Women Who Have Had Sex with Women in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria. The cover shows abstract paintings, almost like ink blots, with with humanoid silhouettes visible]
praisethelorde:


dqueerafricans:


Struggling Alone: Women who have sex with women in Burkina Faso, Nigeria and Ghana
This report is a result of a five-month social context analysis conducted by a young, lesbian-led organization, The Queer African Youth Networking Center (QAYN) to call attentions to the lived realities of lesbians, bisexual, transgendered, queer and women who have sex with women (LBTQWSW) in three West African countries. A group of passionate and resourceful volunteers engaged in cross-country interviews and focus group discussions to uncover the challenges faced and strategies used by LBTQWSW in living their lives as same-gender loving
 
Downlonad PDF @ http://www.qayn-center.org/research-publications/


go download!!! available in french and english!

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: the cover of Struggling Alone: The Lived Realities of Women Who Have Had Sex with Women in Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria. The cover shows abstract paintings, almost like ink blots, with with humanoid silhouettes visible]

praisethelorde:

dqueerafricans:

Struggling Alone: Women who have sex with women in Burkina Faso, Nigeria and Ghana

This report is a result of a five-month social context analysis conducted by a young, lesbian-led organization, The Queer African Youth Networking Center (QAYN) to call attentions to the lived realities of lesbians, bisexual, transgendered, queer and women who have sex with women (LBTQWSW) in three West African countries. A group of passionate and resourceful volunteers engaged in cross-country interviews and focus group discussions to uncover the challenges faced and strategies used by LBTQWSW in living their lives as same-gender loving

 

Downlonad PDF @ http://www.qayn-center.org/research-publications/

go download!!! available in french and english!

The Huffington Post also messed up with regards to bisexuality not long ago when they reprinted parts of an interview with Alan Cumming under the headline, ”Alan Cumming sounds off on being bisexual despite being married to a man.”

Hmm … Camille sounds off on being omnivorous despite eating a salad. Camille sounds off on liking animals despite having a cat. Camille sounds off on loving the Harry Potter series despite currently reading "The Order of the Phoenix".

Being married to a man falls perfectly under the purview of things that a bisexual man might do, so why are we framing this as if Alan Cumming is doing something radical or as if bisexual men never get married or as if people in same-sex relationships are exclusively gay or lesbian?

—Camille, of GayWrites on YouTube (via jacquelynn)